Women in the Workforce Summit Draws Legislators, Activists, to Haddonfield

Women in the Workforce Summit, held in Haddonfield, NJ by Rep. Donald Norcross and Assemblywoman Patricia Lampitt (Steve Lubetkin photo/StateBroadcastNews.comWomen in the Workforce Summit, held in Haddonfield, NJ by Rep. Donald Norcross and Assemblywoman Patricia Lampitt (Steve Lubetkin photo/StateBroadcastNews.com

HADDONFIELD, NJ—(SBN)—Women face continuing discrimination in the workplace including challenges over such issues as pay equity, equal benefits, job opportunities, and child and elder care, panelists told a predominately female audience last night.

The “Women in the Workforce” summit, organized by First District Congressman Donald Norcross, featured two panels of activists and leaders in the field of women’s rights in the workplace.

StateBroadcastNews.com is pleased to provide audio podcasts of the panel discussions in the players below.

NJ Rep. Donald Norcross (D-1) introduces the first panel at his Women in the Workforce Summit, at the Haddon Fortnightly, Haddonfield, NJ. From left: Analilia Mejia, Executive Director, NJ Working Families; Loretta Winters, President, Gloucester County NAACP; Sally Goodson, National Board member and Former President, American Association of University Women; and Ann Twomey, President, Health Professionals and Allied Employees, AFT/AFL-CIO (Steve Lubetkin photo/StateBroadcastNews.com)

NJ Rep. Donald Norcross (D-1) introduces the first panel at his Women in the Workforce Summit, at the Haddon Fortnightly, Haddonfield, NJ. From left: Analilia Mejia, Executive Director, NJ Working Families; Loretta Winters, President, Gloucester County NAACP; Sally Goodson, National Board member and Former President, American Association of University Women; and Ann Twomey, President, Health Professionals and Allied Employees, AFT/AFL-CIO (Steve Lubetkin photo/StateBroadcastNews.com)

Panel One: Economic Security: Raising the Wage and Equal Pay
Moderator: Mary Cruz, District Director Congressman Norcross
Panel
Analilia Mejia, Executive Director, NJ Working Families
Loretta Winters, President, Gloucester County NAACP
Sally Goodson, National Board member and Former President, American Association of University Women
Ann Twomey, President, Health Professionals and Allied Employees, AFT/AFL-CIO

On panel 2, "Paid leave, Affordable Child Care," from left: Rep. Norcross; Karen White, Associate Director Rutgers Department of Women and Work; Nadia Hussain, Maternal Justice Campaign Director MomsRising; Evelyn Liebman, Director of Advocacy, AARP NJ; Holly Low, Master of Public Policy Candidate, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy & New Jersey Policy Perspective 2017 Kathleen Crotty Fellow; Amber Pallante, Trustee, Communication Workers of America 1014; Fareeda Mabry, Lead Organizer, Communication Workers of America District 1 (Steve Lubetkin photo/StateBroadcastNews.com. Used by Permission)

On panel 2, “Paid leave, Affordable Child Care,” from left: Rep. Norcross; Karen White, Associate Director Rutgers Department of Women and Work; Nadia Hussain, Maternal Justice Campaign Director MomsRising; Evelyn Liebman, Director of Advocacy, AARP NJ; Holly Low, Master of Public Policy Candidate, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy & New Jersey Policy Perspective 2017 Kathleen Crotty Fellow; Amber Pallante, Trustee, Communication Workers of America 1014; Fareeda Mabry, Lead Organizer, Communication Workers of America District 1 (Steve Lubetkin photo/StateBroadcastNews.com. Used by Permission)

Panel Two: Paid leave, Affordable Child Care
Moderator:
Assemblywoman Pam Lampitt
Panel:
Karen White, Associate Director Rutgers Department of Women and Work
Nadia Hussain, Maternal Justice Campaign Director MomsRising
Evelyn Liebman, Director of Advocacy, AARP NJ
Holly Low, Master of Public Policy Candidate, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy & New Jersey Policy Perspective 2017 Kathleen Crotty Fellow
Amber Pallante, Trustee, Communication Workers of America 1014
Fareeda Mabry, Lead Organizer, Communication Workers of America District 1

About the Author

Steve Lubetkin

Award-winning news-style documentary videographer and audio reporter/podcaster.

  • PeacePromoter

    Women’s advocates have long insisted employers pay women less than men for doing exactly the same work in the exact same occupations and careers, working side-by-side with men on the same job for the same organization, working the same number of hours per week, traveling the same amount of time for work obligations, with the same exact work experience and education, with exactly the same level of productivity.

    If the advocates know women are paid less, working women surely know it. So where are the millions of lawsuits? If the women don’t know they’re paid less, and the advocates do know it (how would THAT happen?), why haven’t the advocates notified them? And why haven’t they named the employers to embarass them and helped the women sue?

    It’s mostly ideological noise to help secure female votes for Democrats.

    Here’s how I come to that conclusion:

    Although insisting women are paid less for the exact same work, women’s advocates also seem to think employers are cut-throat competitors whose prime modus operandi is greed. (“Corporate greed” may be one of the Left’s more salient rallying calls.)

    Thus they no doubt believe employers would hire only illegal immigrants for their lower labor cost if they could get away with it (many do get away with it), or would move their business to a cheap-labor country to save money (many do this even more since “the onrush of globalization, which enables companies to find cheap labor abroad” http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2017/06/02/how_elites_got_us_into_trouble_–_and_can_help_get_us_out_134069.html), or would replace old workers with young ones for the same reason.

    So why do these same advocates think “greedy, cut-throat employers” would NOT hire only women if, as they say, employers DO get away with paying females at a lower rate than males for the same work?

    Many of America’s most sophisticated women choose to earn less than their male counterparts:

    “Female physicians worked about 5 hours fewer per week than their male counterparts through age 54….” https://www.aamc.org/download/426242/data/ihsreportdownload.pdf?cm_mmc=AAMC-_-ScientificAffairs-_-PDF-_-ihsreport

    “In 2011, 22% of male physicians and 44% of female physicians worked less than full time, up from 7% of men and 29% of women from Cejka’s 2005 survey.” http://www.amednews.com/article/20120326/business/303269974/1/

    “…[O]nly 35 percent of women who have earned MBAs after getting a bachelor’s degree from a top school are working full time.” It “is not surprising that women are not showing up more often in corporations’ top ranks.” http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/why-women-are-leaving-the-workforce-in-record-numbers/

    “Compared to men, women view professional advancement as equally attainable, but less desirable” http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/09/15/1502567112.full.pdf

    “Women Dominate College Majors That Lead to Lower-Paying Work” -Harvard Business Review, April 19, 2017 https://hbr.org/2017/04/women-dominate-college-majors-that-lead-to-lower-paying-work

    See other reasons the wage gap hasn’t closed after thousands of measures over many decades:

    “Salary Secrecy — Discrimination Against Women?” http://malemattersusa.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/salary-secrecy-discrimination-against-women/